Courses Taught at Elizabethtown College


  PH105: Introduction to Western Philosophy    This introductory course to philosophy explores foundational of the occidental tradition and contemporary critiques of these views. This course introduces students to key areas of philosophy (metaphysics, epistemology, logic, politics, human nature, and ethics) as tools for thinking critically about life, morality, knowledge, the nature of mind, reality and the human relationship to nature. Through reading an array of philosophers the student will gain familiarity with foundational questions in historical and contemporary topics in western philosophical traditions and develop the capacity to apply these critiques to their own lives and professional careers.    In this course we will explore philosophy within the greater context of the duties you have in your own life, your profession, and the changing world around you.     Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017. Image: View of Athens, Greece.

PH105: Introduction to Western Philosophy

This introductory course to philosophy explores foundational of the occidental tradition and contemporary critiques of these views. This course introduces students to key areas of philosophy (metaphysics, epistemology, logic, politics, human nature, and ethics) as tools for thinking critically about life, morality, knowledge, the nature of mind, reality and the human relationship to nature. Through reading an array of philosophers the student will gain familiarity with foundational questions in historical and contemporary topics in western philosophical traditions and develop the capacity to apply these critiques to their own lives and professional careers.  In this course we will explore philosophy within the greater context of the duties you have in your own life, your profession, and the changing world around you.

Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017. Image: View of Athens, Greece.


  PH110: Logic and Critical Thinking    This course is an overview of the key skills that are necessary for being a critical thinker in general, and it is an overview of the various impediments to critical thinking and the pitfalls they can lead to such as prejudice and authoritarianism. The focus of the course will be developing logic as toolkit for development argumentation and developing your capacity to apply it towards critical thinking in real world decision-making. Students focus on developing their understanding of argumentation, logical fallacies, inductive/deductive reasoning, as well as application of logic to contemporary issues such as statistical analysis, interpretation of scientific data and moral reasoning. Topics included are: analysis of contemporary political speeches, news and media, statistical analysis, climate change debate in the U.S., and the culture war surrounding moral reasoning.     Taught annually: Spring 2016, Spring 2017  . Image:   Ascensor in Valpara í so, Chile.

PH110: Logic and Critical Thinking

This course is an overview of the key skills that are necessary for being a critical thinker in general, and it is an overview of the various impediments to critical thinking and the pitfalls they can lead to such as prejudice and authoritarianism. The focus of the course will be developing logic as toolkit for development argumentation and developing your capacity to apply it towards critical thinking in real world decision-making. Students focus on developing their understanding of argumentation, logical fallacies, inductive/deductive reasoning, as well as application of logic to contemporary issues such as statistical analysis, interpretation of scientific data and moral reasoning. Topics included are: analysis of contemporary political speeches, news and media, statistical analysis, climate change debate in the U.S., and the culture war surrounding moral reasoning.

Taught annually: Spring 2016, Spring 2017. Image: Ascensor in Valparaíso, Chile.


  FYS: Am I Animal?    This FYS Seminar will explore the question, “Am I Animal?” Answering this question reveals an understanding of not only our own identity but also our understanding of other living beings that share life on Earth. This course will provide you an introduction to   the ethics and politics of our human relationships with other animals. Through academic studies, fiction, and film, we will analyze food ethics, our relationship with pets and domesticated species, animal psychology, and inter-species culture. We will also interrogate concepts of identity as it relates to race, class, gender, and environment more broadly. Throughout the semester, these conversations will help us explore what it means to co-exist with other animals and how that co-existence helps to shape our own humanness and sense of self.    Fall 2017  . Image: El perrito, Vino del Mar, Chile.

FYS: Am I Animal?

This FYS Seminar will explore the question, “Am I Animal?” Answering this question reveals an understanding of not only our own identity but also our understanding of other living beings that share life on Earth. This course will provide you an introduction to the ethics and politics of our human relationships with other animals. Through academic studies, fiction, and film, we will analyze food ethics, our relationship with pets and domesticated species, animal psychology, and inter-species culture. We will also interrogate concepts of identity as it relates to race, class, gender, and environment more broadly. Throughout the semester, these conversations will help us explore what it means to co-exist with other animals and how that co-existence helps to shape our own humanness and sense of self.

Fall 2017. Image: El perrito, Vino del Mar, Chile.

 
  PH370: Comparative Environmental Philosophy: Perspectives from the Americas     
  
 
  
    
  
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    This course introduces philosophical ethics through an engagement with environmental issues regarding the human-nature relationship from diverse perspectives of the Americas. Comparative discussions of topics will be held to provide perspective of key social and environmental problems today, including: development, education, resource use, sustainability, non-human welfare and rights, biological, cultural and linguistic diversity, environmental justice, cultural heritage, land-use and global climate change.  Guided Writing and research Intensive Course (GWR)   Fall 2015, Spring 2017

PH370: Comparative Environmental Philosophy: Perspectives from the Americas

This course introduces philosophical ethics through an engagement with environmental issues regarding the human-nature relationship from diverse perspectives of the Americas. Comparative discussions of topics will be held to provide perspective of key social and environmental problems today, including: development, education, resource use, sustainability, non-human welfare and rights, biological, cultural and linguistic diversity, environmental justice, cultural heritage, land-use and global climate change. Guided Writing and research Intensive Course (GWR)

Fall 2015, Spring 2017


 PH115: Introduction to Ethics    A study of the nature, origin and development of ethical theories from both a historical and contemporary perspective and their relevance to significant current moral dilemmas such as abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment and environmental issues. Special attention is given to the exploration of enduring moral concerns, such as moral realism versus relativism, egoism, altruism, the role of reason in ethics, and the nature of responsible moral decision-making.   This class will examine some of the fundamental issues raised by today’s global society, and how ethics can contribute to solving these issues. Students will become familiar with key issues facing society today and distinct ethical theories developed to address these problems. We will transform this knowledge from thinking about these problems to action by considering how we might solve these problems individually and collectively through an active field philosophy research project.    Fall 2015, Spring 2016  , Fall 2016. Image: U-Pick Sunflowers, Portland, Oregon.

PH115: Introduction to Ethics

 A study of the nature, origin and development of ethical theories from both a historical and contemporary perspective and their relevance to significant current moral dilemmas such as abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment and environmental issues. Special attention is given to the exploration of enduring moral concerns, such as moral realism versus relativism, egoism, altruism, the role of reason in ethics, and the nature of responsible moral decision-making. This class will examine some of the fundamental issues raised by today’s global society, and how ethics can contribute to solving these issues. Students will become familiar with key issues facing society today and distinct ethical theories developed to address these problems. We will transform this knowledge from thinking about these problems to action by considering how we might solve these problems individually and collectively through an active field philosophy research project.

Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016. Image: U-Pick Sunflowers, Portland, Oregon.

  PH372: Perspectives in Sustainability     Shortages in water, fuel, and food pose many ethical, economic, and technological challenges for present and future generations. Yet what it means to live sustainably is no easy question to answer, with diverse interests, perspectives, cultures, and worldviews mixing in this global discourse. Students will learn the various interpretations and applications of sustainability, the role of technology in addressing sustainability issues, and the ethical principles essential for attending to these concerns. This class introduces a basic set of principles that will help students consider such issues as intergenerational equity, social justice in the global community, interspecies respect and protection, and ecological economics. Guided Writing and research Intensive Course (GWR)    Spring 2016  . Image: Annual DIY Festival, Baltimore, MD.

PH372: Perspectives in Sustainability

Shortages in water, fuel, and food pose many ethical, economic, and technological challenges for present and future generations. Yet what it means to live sustainably is no easy question to answer, with diverse interests, perspectives, cultures, and worldviews mixing in this global discourse. Students will learn the various interpretations and applications of sustainability, the role of technology in addressing sustainability issues, and the ethical principles essential for attending to these concerns. This class introduces a basic set of principles that will help students consider such issues as intergenerational equity, social justice in the global community, interspecies respect and protection, and ecological economics. Guided Writing and research Intensive Course (GWR)

Spring 2016. Image: Annual DIY Festival, Baltimore, MD.


 PH255: Advanced Ethics: Business  Business Ethics is part of a four-course sequence in Applied Ethics. In each course, a theoretical foundation for ethical discourse within the respective field is established. This course then proceeds to a detailed treatment of central ethical dilemmas in the actual practice of business. (Summer 2018)

PH255: Advanced Ethics: Business

Business Ethics is part of a four-course sequence in Applied Ethics. In each course, a theoretical foundation for ethical discourse within the respective field is established. This course then proceeds to a detailed treatment of central ethical dilemmas in the actual practice of business. (Summer 2018)

  PH370: Philosophy of the City and Everyday Life    Projections of urban society estimate that over three-quarters of the human population will live within urban environments by 2050.   This course will explore the nature of the city and urbanization processes as a fundamental philosophical question of our time; one that we must confront as we look towards building a sustainable future in our everyday lives. This course includes a Community Based Significant Learning Experience (CBL) and is a Guided Writing and Research Intensive Course (GWR). Successful completion of this course requires 15 hours of service, or the equivalent service field trip provided.    Fall 2016, Fall 2017. Image: "We Must Stop Killing Each Other", Baltimore.

PH370: Philosophy of the City and Everyday Life

Projections of urban society estimate that over three-quarters of the human population will live within urban environments by 2050. This course will explore the nature of the city and urbanization processes as a fundamental philosophical question of our time; one that we must confront as we look towards building a sustainable future in our everyday lives. This course includes a Community Based Significant Learning Experience (CBL) and is a Guided Writing and Research Intensive Course (GWR). Successful completion of this course requires 15 hours of service, or the equivalent service field trip provided.

Fall 2016, Fall 2017. Image: "We Must Stop Killing Each Other", Baltimore.


 Coming Spring 2017  PH500: Urban Philosophy and Policy  Students will engage urban theory and philosophy to address key policy questions regarding urbanizaiton, gentrification, quality of life, and urban growth.

Coming Spring 2017

PH500: Urban Philosophy and Policy

Students will engage urban theory and philosophy to address key policy questions regarding urbanizaiton, gentrification, quality of life, and urban growth.